How to Conjugate Spanish Verbs in the Future Present Tense

In today’s Spanish lesson, I will teach you the Future Perfect tense. This tense is also known as the Future Present Perfect. I decided to write this lesson after a reader emailed and me and asked “Anna, how do you say ‘will have’ in Spanish. I want to know how to say things like: I will have eaten before you arrive.”

In the same way that “will have” is used in in English, in Spanish the Future Perfect Tense is used to express actions that will take place in the future before another action.

Before I give you a few examples, I should warn you that this is an advanced topic in Spanish grammar. You will find this topic in the top Spanish grammar books, but I don’t know of any self-study Spanish course on the market that covers this topic. So you may want to pay close attention since there
are limited materials that teach this topic.

Let’s take a look at some examples:

Antes de que partamos, habré hecho mi equipaje.
(Before we leave, I will have done my luggage.)

By the way, I hope that you noticed that in Spanish you cannot only “empacar” (pack) your luggage. You can also “hacer” your luggage which means to “do” or “make” your luggage in Spanish. That’s why I used the verb “hacer” in Spanish in this instance.

Luego de tres años, habrá recorrido Europa.
After three years, he will have traveled through Europe.

Para cuando llegues, habré cocinado la cena.
By the time you arrive, I will have cooked dinner.

Habrás leído todo el material para fin del año.
You will have read all the material by the end of the year.

Antes de que estrenen la película, habremos leído el libro.
Before they premiere the movie, we will have read the book.

This concludes today’s lesson on how to conjugate Spanish verbs in Future Present Perfect tense.

Report Presentation – The Form of the Report

There are various different formats for laboratory reports in use. These vary according to the type of work being reported, the purpose of the work or the report and the recipients for which the report is intended. Reports of original research conducted to further scientific knowledge in a specific area require a different format from reports of quality control experiments conducted in a company laboratory and yet other formats may be required for student reports on experiments. A student may be expected to follow one format for recording experiments in a laboratory record book as they are being performed and a different format when writing up the information from the record book for a formal laboratory report later in the term. The format may also vary due to differences in the type of laboratory work which is done for the different subjects. Where the purpose of the experiment is to confirm or reject a hypothesis, the format of the report will differ from that of an investigation of the quality, composition or properties of a product. The purpose of most student laboratory reports is to indicate the students’ understanding of aim, theory, laboratory procedures, etc., so would be emphasized in a format prescribed for these reports.

Finally, if the report is to be submitted to a lecturer, the format may be substantially different from that of a report submitted for publication in a professional journal, while a different format might be expected in a report to a government, an agency or private company. An obvious way in which laboratory report formats differ is the division of the report into sections. Whereas all laboratory reports can be thought of as consisting of four main parts (introduction, procedure, results and conclusion), there is considerable variation in the headings under which the information in each section of the report is to be written. Some of these headings may have an equivalent meaning: apparatus = materials, procedure = methods, data = results. In other cases, more specific headings are added where there is a need to draw attention to specific information in the report.

Example of the Form of a Report

1. Title needs to emphasize the nature of the work / investigation briefly (in less than 10 words) and accurately. This may also be called the Heading in a laboratory record book. State the date of performing the experiment.

2. Aim or Objective. This may be used in the place of the heading: Introduction. It is used to state clearly and concisely the purpose of the work.

3. Theory emphasizes the need to identify the background theory leading up to the experiment or the theory which the experiment is designed to illustrate or prove. This may also include a brief literature review to provide the status of current knowledge in the field.

4. Hypothesis – The hypothesis should be identified where the work is based on previous findings or involves the application of established theory to new situations. Note, however, that not all laboratory work is necessarily concerned with the testing of hypothesis.

5. Apparatus or Materials emphasize the need of the apparatus to be used and the way it is set up. It states the order of all steps to be taken.

6. Procedure or Methods emphasize the need to provide a step-by-step account of how the work was done, a separate heading may be used. This could be important to assess later a quality of investigation. It may include reference to a specific ISO or internationally accepted laboratory standard procedure.

7. Diagrams. A separate heading in the Procedure section devoted to diagrams or photographs emphasises the importance of presenting this information in a clear, concise form rather than written form.

8. Measurements or Results emphasize the importance of reporting specific readings or other observations as they were taken and to record results or outcomes with dates and signatures in order to provide evidence for possible future filing of a patent or intellectual property protection. In this step you take measurements, produce tables and give a relevant sample calculation of how you obtained the final results.

9. Graphs emphasize the need to present an overall summary of the results in a visual form. Data would be presented in tables whereas Graphs would show the relationships between the data and possible trends in a clear, easily read form.

10. Discussion or Results – It is one of the most important parts of the report as here you explain, analyse and interpret the results leading to conclusion. It shows the writer’s understanding of the concepts behind the data. If any differences with the Hypothesis or Objectives occurred explain the reason.

11. Conclusion – The purpose of the Conclusion is to discuss questions arising from the report and make suggestions for further work.

12. References – Here you state the information that has been obtained from textbooks, reference books, articles, investigations, etc. and where these sources of information are mentioned in the text. These references are used as a source of information for background theory, previous findings on which this work is based, laboratory procedures, etc. The References are listed numerically at the end of the report to enable a reader to consult these works for further details.

Should Presentation Training Be a Part of Soft Skills Training Programs?

The presentation skills training program is a key component of Soft Skills Training and Development for any working professional. It is designed to help professionals achieve significant career growth by leaving a memorable impression with their audiences consistently. The focus of this program is on two aspects – how to create an impressive presentation and how to present this information powerfully.

Why Presentation Training?

There are numerous reasons, but the following two reasons are the most critical:

  • Flawless presentation skills are the key to a career graph poised for constant upward growth, and
  • As a presenter, you don’t just need to present facts and figures, you also need to be engaging, vibrant and capture your audience’s attention.

Clarity of diction and non-verbal skills are just as important as the grades you graduate with. While you might not like the idea of standing up in front of a crowd, as a professional, you’ll need to, sooner or later.

The idea is to project a confident and effervescent personality with the ability to connect with people at large. But it’s not a skill always inherent in people. It requires a blend of leadership skills and a conscious focus on progressing beyond limiting mindsets. This is the precise reason why most B-schools hire services of soft skill training companies to train their graduates.

The Need for Soft Skills Development

Very often, we see that unhealthy mindsets with a penchant for negative thinking have a direct bearing on a slew of life conditions, including job performance. However, what also gets in the way of success is a lack of awareness of our own reactions and learned behavior.

Let’s look at a simple question to which many don’t know the answer. The question is, “How is pop corn made?” The answer – in every kernel of corn there is a drop of water. When heat is applied to the corn, the water inside the corn starts to increase in temperature and vaporizes and expands in space. This causes the corn to burst open, thus forming popcorn. When we apply the same concept with regards to our mindsets when under pressure, what emerges is indicative of the mindsets that we nurse on the inside of us. The ability to handle challenges calmly and constructively cannot be developed if we harbor negative and limiting mindsets. The behaviors, which are a result of our mindsets, are what we call as soft skills. Hence working on specific types of soft skills has a direct impact on our mindset. For example, when you are conducting a presentation, the manifesting behavior of confidence or nervousness is what is referred to as ‘soft skills’ and our existing mindsets cause this behavior.

Most Soft Skills Training Programs focus on techniques that enable the participants to create empowering mindsets that help them to present with confidence and charisma as the Indian education system does not provide too many opportunities for public speaking in the curriculum.