How to Conjugate Spanish Verbs in the Future Present Tense

In today’s Spanish lesson, I will teach you the Future Perfect tense. This tense is also known as the Future Present Perfect. I decided to write this lesson after a reader emailed and me and asked “Anna, how do you say ‘will have’ in Spanish. I want to know how to say things like: I will have eaten before you arrive.”

In the same way that “will have” is used in in English, in Spanish the Future Perfect Tense is used to express actions that will take place in the future before another action.

Before I give you a few examples, I should warn you that this is an advanced topic in Spanish grammar. You will find this topic in the top Spanish grammar books, but I don’t know of any self-study Spanish course on the market that covers this topic. So you may want to pay close attention since there
are limited materials that teach this topic.

Let’s take a look at some examples:

Antes de que partamos, habré hecho mi equipaje.
(Before we leave, I will have done my luggage.)

By the way, I hope that you noticed that in Spanish you cannot only “empacar” (pack) your luggage. You can also “hacer” your luggage which means to “do” or “make” your luggage in Spanish. That’s why I used the verb “hacer” in Spanish in this instance.

Luego de tres años, habrá recorrido Europa.
After three years, he will have traveled through Europe.

Para cuando llegues, habré cocinado la cena.
By the time you arrive, I will have cooked dinner.

Habrás leído todo el material para fin del año.
You will have read all the material by the end of the year.

Antes de que estrenen la película, habremos leído el libro.
Before they premiere the movie, we will have read the book.

This concludes today’s lesson on how to conjugate Spanish verbs in Future Present Perfect tense.

Funding Source’s, What to Look For When On the Hunt, and How To Present

Now that you have written your business plan, have your preliminary financial data in place, you need money to make it happen.

How do you find that money? If you have saved up some, you can use that, or you can go to friends and family and get some money from them, if they support your concept and think you can do it. (F/F/P phase)

There are two other sources to go to as well, Angels or Venture Capitalist.

An Angel is a person or group that typically gives a startup up idea from $25K to as much as $1M (that much is typically an Angel Group) to begin developing the Proof of Concept or the product itself. You should go to an Angel Funding Source if you need less than $1M, and typically less than $500K, to get your product built, or if your plan requires a Proof of Concept, the Proof of Concept built.

If you go to an Angel or Angel Group you need to look at some factors before starting to talk to them. Do some research and find out:

1. What the person/group you are interested in asking money from typically invests their money in.

2. If they accept Venture Capital as a future source of funding.

3. If they are willing to add more cash down the line to help reach that “next” milestone.

4. If they have contacts with people that may be interested in providing more money should the need arise.

5. If they have contacts that may want to use your product/services.

6. How much control/hands on activity they want to have with your company. (Do they want to sit on your Board of Directors or Board of Advisors, do they have any say on how the money is spent within the company?)

7. And if you are going for a lot more money in the near future, if they work with or know any Venture Capitalist that like your industry/product type.

It is the recommendation of TDBell Enterprises, Inc., that you work with your Angel Investors as an Equity Play, meaning they get a small portion of your company for the money they invest. We do not recommend that you use the money as a loan.

A Venture Capitalist is typically a person or company that has gone to from one to many people, companies, retirement funds or other large pools of money and created a Venture Fund that is geared to one or more industries/products/services. These funds typically finance a company from $500K to over $200M, taking stock in the company as “collateral”.

Like going to the Angel Investors, you need to look at a few things when you go to a Venture Capitalist:

1. Has the person/group invested in companies in your industry?

2. At what stage of the company (Proof of Concept, Development, Revenue in place (and if so, at level of revenue is required), etc.)

3. Are they going to be Sole Investors at this stage, or are they going to have other groups joining in this round with them.

4. How involved are they going to get with your company? (Do they want to manage the company, etc?)

5. Do their portfolio companies need your product and will they introduce you to them if they do?

6. How much of the company stock do they want?

7. Will they add more funds to the company should it be needed? (And if so, at what cost to you?)

8. How much reporting do you have to do to them?

After you have looked at the available Angels that you can find, the available Venture Capitalist you can find, you need to decide which path is the best way to go for your company and your “style”.

If you are confident that you will need Venture Capital level funding, after you narrow your search down to the Venture Capitalist you are going to target, and have answered the above 8 (and a few more I’m sure) questions, you need to decide if you need to go to an Angel first.

At this point you start fine tuning your financial section to meet the needs of the Investor you are going to approach. The over all business plan stays the same through this process (unless you are fine tuning it to meet development/production needs due to feedback, etc.). The only part of the business plan that changes is the Financial Section(s) and that changes based on the target Investors. You already have in your plan the steps to go live and to go to revenue. You have your milestones written down, etc, in the plan, and you have “line items” in the financial section that correspond.

Example:

You are going to create a software/hardware intensive service product that requires FCC approval of the Concept. To create the Proof of Concept to meet the FCC needs, you need $750,000, but to go to revenue you will need roughly $35M (which includes the $750K). You are able to get a Friends/Family/Personal Pockets (F/F/P) round up of $150K.

Your research shows that the available list of Venture Capitalist out there that would fund this project require you to have your FCC permits in place, a working model of your service product in place, and 1 solid customer ready to pay for your services once you are able to build out.

In this example you would need to go to one or more Angel Investors to help you reach the remaining $600K to get your prototype up and running to do the testing that will satisfy the FCC. You would want to find an Angel or Angel Group that allows for future rounds of Venture Capitalist backed funding. This group would hopefully be willing to add a bit more in if needed to go past any “gotcha’s” that may crop up as you answer the FCC requirements.

Now that you know you are going to an Angel or Angels you rewrite your financial section to show an investment of $150K (F/F/P), the need and the use of the $600K from the Angels, and when the remain investment of $34,250,000 will be requested and how it will be used.

When you write up your presentation to the Angel(s) you show the Living business plan, current Financials, and talk to your needs.

When you get to the Venture Capitalist later you write up your presentation, you show the current business plan, which no longer has the Proof of Concept stage in it (it’s completed successfully, and not part of your plans now, living business plan remember?) but shows next stages over the next three to five years as perceived today, with the financials now showing how you spent the last $750K, and what you will be doing with the next $34,250,000 that you are asking from the Venture Capitalist.

How to do tax-saving with mutual fund investments?

It might be difficult watch your hard earned savings simply getting deducted in taxes. The simplest thing to do would be to invest in a tax saving mutual fund, which helps you build wealth and reduce your tax liability. Remember though tax planning is challenging, it can also be rewarding if done correctly. So, we are giving you a quick run through about how you can save your hard earned money by investing in a Tax Saving (ELSS) mutual fund scheme.

An ELSS (Equity Linked Saving Scheme) could become you best choice if you are looking for:

Tax benefit u/s section 80C of the Income Tax Act, 1961
Opportunity to invest in the equity markets to grow your investment corpus
Long term Capital appreciation
Shortest lock-in period as compared to other tax saving instruments under Section 80C

As per SEBI’s categorization norms for mutual funds, ELSS is an open-ended equity-oriented mutual fund scheme that invests a minimum 80% of its assets in equity & equity related instruments.

Generally investment objective of an ELSS tax saving mutual funds is to achieve long-term capital appreciation by investing primarily in equity and equity-related instruments.

A distinctive feature about ELSS is that compared to the other open-ended diversified equity mutual funds, investment in ELSS is subject to a compulsory lock-in period of three years. During this period, you cannot redeem your investments before the completion of three years from the date of the investment. After the lock-in, if you decide to redeem the investment on the realized gain, as per the current tax rules, LTCG (Long-term capital gains) tax applies.

Remember, though tax saving may be a major purpose behind investment in tax saving mutual fund; it’s a general expectation that any investment should also deliver some return. Hence, while evaluating your options for the tax saving mutual funds of 2021 to invest in, you need to look at the return column too. Do not forget that as an investor, should know the risk- reward tradeoff specific to an investment before taking the plunge with your hard earning money. You need to look beyond to see a historical growth of ELSS tax saving mutual funds for a period of at least 3 years.

If you are looking to save tax, lower your capital gains tax and long term risk adjusted returns from your investments, maybe you should consider adding an ELSS tax saving mutual fund to your portfolio.