Timeshares and Timeshare Presentations – Dare to Say No

Some owners have purchased multiple timeshares because they just don’t know how to say “No.” In fact, timeshare owners are more likely to purchase another timeshare than a non-buyer. It’s hard to even begin to comprehend how many timeshares a single couple might end up owning because of this apparent fear of the word “No.” So for the timeshare owner or non-owner alike, here is your best tip on how to say “No” at a timeshare presentation:

Request a copy of the timeshare contract for your lawyer.

If you ask for the timeshare contract for your lawyer to read and review, you’ll create an impasse. Timeshare sales people are trained to never let you remove any documentation from the presentation room. It might contradict what may have been said during your visit, and the length of many timeshare contracts is enough to scare off buyers. So more likely than not, you won’t get that copy you respectfully requested.

Regardless whether you get a copy or not, you’ll probably want to leave at this point. Yet the sales process has yet to go through the gauntlet of sales techniques used at these presentations. So be prepared for these timeshare sales people to stall or change the subject away from the requested documentation.

They may ask why you need it since there is a rescission period during which you can cancel your contract. You can respond by saying that you’d be more comfortable taking the contract to your lawyer, or that for large purchases at presentation-style sales meetings, you feel that its necessary to take precautions and get your lawyer involved before committing to a decision.

Don’t worry if you don’t really have a lawyer. If you feel guilty about fibbing to the timeshare sales people, just know that you probably know someone who knows a lawyer, or happens to be one and wouldn’t mind acting as your lawyer.

The beauty of this objection is that you aren’t really saying “No” to buying a timeshare, just that you want to take the time to investigate it properly. Sales people are trained to overcome “No” responses. They may even be able to overcome the “Take the documents out of the room” objection as well, but it’s definitely not as easy a task because it’s not heard as much as “I can’t afford it” or “I don’t take enough vacations.”

So keep this tip in mind the next time you find yourself at a timeshare presentation. Remember, if you REALLY want a buy a timeshare, purchasing a timeshare in the presentation room is the most expensive place to do it. Try your best to walk out of the room as soon as you can, but be prepared to stay a while. Even the most effective objection won’t get you through quickly.

Living in the Present – The Power of Writing

Certain pastimes and activities have the power to maintain our consciousness in the present – the here and now. Rock climbing is a dangerous sport – a potentially lethal one – rock climbers live with the threat of death or injury every time they climb. The difficulties they face are objective ones, first and foremost, and the risks they take are calculated ones – rock climbers are not reckless – not living ones at any rate.

Most of the time, we live in a sort of non-time – a remnant of the past moving us to do things based on our memory and its power to haunt the present, or the future, with its ability to confront ourselves and our limitations ahead of action – apprehension.

The rock climber on the face of a cliff or mountain knows only the present; if he removes himself from the here and now of his situation, if he allows himself to be distracted from the task in front of him, he risks falling to his death or certain injury – he cannot allow himself to stray from the present.

The writer, Eckhart Tolle (‘The Power of Now’ and others) tells us that, “Life is now. There was never a time when your life was not now, nor will there ever be.” And if you think about it, that is absolutely true – the things that you did in your youth, you did in the present – not the past; the things you will experience in the future, in ten minutes or ten years time, will be experienced in the present – the present of then!

Now I know that rock climbing is out for most of us, only the young, athletic and the daring may go that way. Other dangerous sports are out for similar reasons, but experiencing the present in the natural intensity of the moment is still very much open to us.

Tolle again tells us that, “To be free of time is to be free of the psychological need of past for your identity and future for your fulfillment.” As someone who writes regularly and often, I can tell you that in the very act of writing – composing sentences, paragraphs – connected paragraphs – essays, stories, novels – whatever, the act of writing frees up the mind, removes encumbrances from the past and the future, planting you and your mind firmly in the present – by the power of concentration needed to write well and write continually.

I find writing something metaphorically like crossing a river using stepping stones – the next stone and the next after that are only visible and reachable once you step on the one before that next stone. Three stones further back and you are unable to jump the distance to that next stone – you can only reach it from the one you are standing on at the moment.
So it is with writing – you create meaning and sense as you write, and as you move further into your writing you find what you want to say. The well known playwright and novelist, Willy Russell, who penned those famous stories made into the successful films, ‘Educating Rita’ and ‘Shirley Valentine’ when asked why he wrote about what he didn’t know, said, “How do I know what I know until I write about it?”

He was not being facetious for once; he was describing the process of discovering what you know whilst writing. The accumulated knowledge – even wisdom’ from a life lived is down there waiting to be tapped. Then, once words start to bring it out, it will flow like oil from a well, gushing with knowledge. For the fact is that Russell was correct; you don’t know what you know until you write – no other medium draws something out of you in quite the same way.

Worthwhile, coherent conversation comes close, but that dependency on your interlocutor deprives you of the personal discovery that comes with writing.

Like rock climbing, writing has one very clear resemblance – few people ever get round to trying it, which is a pity because both activities free the mind from our normal obsession with what has gone and what may come. Now is all there is, in reality; and both scaling precipices and writing confront you with that fact. And, for the brief time you are out there on the north face of the Eiger, or, in my case, in the middle of writing something to be read by others, that presence liberates you from what has a habit of enslaving all of us – worry – stress – regrets – you can’t be worried, stressed, or regretful when you are totally engaged in something that requires you to debunk that which you can well do without.

Using Remote Desktop Access to Make Remote Presentations

Whenever many small business owners hear about the possibility of making remote presentations, they tend to view it as something that is good, but which is beyond their means. You can’t blame them. They are mostly just being realistic, by way of appreciating the considerable cost that would go into the purchase of the equipment through which the remote presentations can be made. True, they can see the considerable cost savings they stand to make through such remote presentations (by of things like getting to avoid travel costs). But they simply can’t see where they would get the money to purchase the hardware and software required for such remote-presentations.

It is true that in the traditional way of thinking, a huge input of capital would be required for making remote presentations. The presentations may have to be made through video conferencing technology, and the hardware required for this doesn’t come cheap. And that is to say nothing of the software and bandwidth costs, though it is the initial investment element that tends to be more bothersome.

As it turns out, though, there are cheaper ways through which remote presentations can be done. One of those, and which is pretty much something that any business can afford, is the opportunity for remote presentations available through remote desktop access tools.

No extra hardware is required to make the remote desktop access possible. The only thing you may need to put some money onto is the purchase of the software which makes the whole venture possible. And such software, as it turns out, is not expensive either. In fact, inasmuch as you can afford an operating system for your office computers, it would be something you can afford with ease.

In using remote desktop access to make remote-presentations, you simply grant the people who will be ‘attending’ your presentation rights to remotely access your computer’s desktop through the specialized software that forms the backbone of the platform. Once they are logged on, and they have access to your desktop, you simply start running the presentation on your desktop, and they see it on their respective computers, as it is them who were running it! The presentations itself could be one that you will have made using a program like PowerPoint, so it is not something you are likely to incur any extra costs on. And you can add elements such as voice to it and even animations to simulate your pointing out of various elements on a project – so that it becomes as real as possible.

That is one of the ways through which you can get to cost effectively make remote presentations – right from your computer’s desktop, using remote desktop access software. The way most of that software works is such that you can give the ‘attendees’ temporary access rights to your desktop for the duration of the presentation. These are rights you go ahead to withdraw at the end of the presentation; to prevent the risk of the attendees starting rummaging through your computer after the presentation.

So, there you have: the way to cost effectively make a remote-presentation, using remote desktop access software programs.